Courage, Encouragement, God girl, Health, Love, running, Thank you

Coach

Almost 4 years ago when me and my friends decided to form a running group (3f Striders). At first it was composed of a handful of people (around 10 people).

Now this group has grown bigger and it’s getting bigger every week (unstoppable). Well that’s the goal, to inspire more people to be fit and healthy physically and spiritually.

But that’s not what I wanted to emphasized here. Well It’s me being a COACH (duh yeah!). It cringes me to be called one before. How did I ever got into this kind of tittle? I don’t have certification and not even the fastest in my league (but I’m very strong, is that counted?).

I can list all of my strengths and abilities but it all boils down to being passionate. There, that’s the root of it all. I felt I am called to do this. I am made to inspire and to encourage (one of my strengths).

pink

3f Striders Sunday Training

So yes, I am hesitant to be called “Coach” until I have learned this story.

(here it goes)

Main road along the Danube River, between Vienna and Budapest there is a small Hungarian village called Kocs. These two great cities needed well-built, fast vehicles that could carry more than two people over the bumpy roads of the day in as much comfort as was then possible. During the 14th-century, the craftsmen of Kocs began to build the most superior wagons, carts and carriages in all the land.

One of the best of these multi-horse carts was called, in Hungarian, “Kocsi Szekér” or “A Wagon from Kocs”.  The design was so compact, elegant and sturdy that it’s spread throughout Europe. The German-speaking Viennese started to call this vehicle a “Kutsche”, which is how they heard Hungarians saying the name of their little carriage-making town. From Vienna these lively vehicles travelled to Paris, and the French adapting the Austrian word, called it a “Coche”. When it arrived in Rome in Italian, it was a “Cocchio”. Eventually, the English called it a “Coach”. When Anne of Bohemia married England’s Richard II in 1382, she brought carriages from Kocs, Hungary with her to England.

Eventually royalty throughout Europe were riding in the best horse-drawn carriages they had ever seen. Wealthy squires had their servants read to them as they drove in these coaches about the countryside or to pass the time on long trips into a nearby city. So, really, the first “Coaches” took very important people from where they were – to where they wanted to go. And many of them learned along the way (they lived happily ever after).

dcs

3f Striders Finishers and Supporters

I asked myself, am I teaching those I am responsible for some other valuable life lessons during the ride? Definitely, it can’t be just about the race, trainings, wins and losses, championships or whatever I am coaching them in. There has to be something more than that. Finishing the race is one goal, but teaching Life Lessons is the more important goal.

Are they learning anything about themselves?

Are they developing some skills and lessons they can use after the race?

That is the true value of sports. They think they’re just playing, but what they are experiencing is a small-scale version of life that will lay foundation for their future.

swim

3f Striders Wednesday Swim

I think the real role of a coach is to take those we are responsible for from where they are to where they want to go!

As a coach, I need to continually ask myself, “Am I taking them where THEY really want to go?”

See, a coach must take time to get to know those they are coaching and take time to find out their goals. There is no “plug and play” method of coaching, no one-size-fits-all plan. Each individual is different.

I now accept the fact that I am a Coach. I’m slowly getting over the cringe and shyness.

From a gently timid fat girl to gently fierce coach, yes that’s me!

Coach Eden #MaitimMagandaMalakas

garhoud

3f Striders Friday Long Run

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